A Guide to Researching a House Before Attending a Showing

House hunting can be time-consuming. With so many houses currently on the market and so little time to spend visiting homes, it’s important to narrow down your search as much as possible before attending a showing.

Fortunately, in today’s digital world, it’s possible to learn a great deal of important information right from your phone or computer.

In today’s post, I’m going to give you some advice on researching the homes you’re thinking about making an offer on. We’ll talk about researching the neighborhood, and–of course–the house itself.

Putting together all the stats on the home

Let’s start with, arguably, the most important thing to research: the house itself. When you want to learn about a home, the best place to look is usually the real estate listing. Since most of us discover homes through listings, odds are you’re already on this page. However, there’s a lot of information in a listing, so take the time to go through it and gleam whatever you can from the home’s description.

Next, Google the house address and click on listings from other real estate sites. Oftentimes, a house that has been sold before will have multiple listings across the internet with different data.

Once you’ve scoured the listings, head over to the county assessor’s website to look at records of the home’s ownership. This will tell you who bought and sold the home and when. There’s much you can learn from this data, especially if a home is being sold frequently. You can also use this information to contact previous owners to ask them questions about the home that the current owner might not know the answer to.

Snooping around the neighborhood

If the house is nearby, simply driving through the neighborhood can tell you a lot. You can visit the neighborhood during rush hour to see what the traffic is like, for example.

However, it isn’t always practical to take the time to visit a house that you aren’t sure you’re interested in. So, what’s the next best thing? Google Maps.

Visit the neighborhood on Google Maps to see what’s in the area. Are there a lot of closed businesses? That could be a sign of a neighborhood in decline. Check for nearby things like parks, grocery stores, and other amenities that could influence your buying decision.

Next, use Google’s “street view” feature and explore the neighborhood. You can see what kind of shape the other homes are in, and find out the condition of infrastructure like roads and sidewalks.

Note addresses of comparable homes in the neighborhood and look up their purchase prices. This will give you an idea of whether the home is being priced appropriately.

If you’re having trouble finding information on a home, such as sale records, try contacting the local assessor. They should be able to point you to a database that will help you in your search.

Boring Flooring?

Deciding on flooring for your home sounds boring. No one wants to research and compare all the different options, but the floors get used more than just about everything else in your home. So, spending some time looking into what flooring will be the best value for you is a wise investment of time. Get ready to take on an adventure of comparing and sorting through all the different flooring options in today’s market. 

No Flying Carpets Here

Carpeting may seem like a simple choice, when in fact there is a lot to consider when it comes to wall-to-wall carpeting. Determine where you would like to use carpet, and how much traffic there will be on a daily basis. Some types of carpeting such as loped Berber handle high traffic flow well. Carpet made from nylon, a man-made material, is excellent for heavy usage areas. Other carpet materials such as wool and olefin are also high traffic area carpet materials that give you a good value for your dollars spent. The straight cut pile and plush styles of carpeting are both softer then loop and are great for bedrooms and lighter traffic areas. 

Knock on Wood; or Something Like It

If you or your family member suffer from allergies carpeting may not be the best choice; in that case, you certainly may want to look into hardwood or engineered wood. Hardwood, as the name implies, is durable wood planks. This option comes in lots of color and shade choices but can be costly for larger projects. Hardwood is easy to clean and a substantial long-term investment. Engineered wood is a durable choice and a bit less expensive than hardwood. Moisture can cause hardwood to warp over time, whereas engineered wood can handle the humidity a bit better. 

Not Your Grandparent’s Laminate

Laminate flooring is the least expensive out of the above choices can also be advantageous to a household with allergies. Also, easily cleaned and maintained, but resistant to fading, laminate comes in a wide selection and design options. You can acquire a laminate that looks like hardwood or other higher-end flooring materials while keeping within a modest budget. With laminate materials you can be creative with color and patterns, adding a custom look to any room. 

Look through open houses in your area and see what kind of flooring choices others have used throughout their homes.